ratak-monodosico:

Famous chord near the end of Scriabin’s Sonata No. 7 (1911), spanning 5 octaves.

ratak-monodosico:

Famous chord near the end of Scriabin’s Sonata No. 7 (1911), spanning 5 octaves.

composersillustrated:

Alexander Scriabin by Leonid Pasternak

composersillustrated:

Alexander Scriabin by Leonid Pasternak

3,149 plays

likeafieldmouse:

Alexander Scriabin - Etude in C-sharp Minor, Op. 2/1 - Vladimir Horowitz

zolotoivek:

Aleksandr Scriabin writing, 1901.

zolotoivek:

Aleksandr Scriabin writing, 1901.

1,083 plays

hintersatz:

Vladimir Horowitz plays (one of his favorite encore) Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin’s Etude in D#m Op.8 No.12. 

I have listened at least 10 different versions of this etude before uploading. Damn you Horowitz. 

notationnotes:

Scriabin :: key colour scheme
a system of corresponding colors and sounds which was based upon the cycle of fifths and the light spectrum. (1908-1910)

notationnotes:

Scriabin :: key colour scheme

a system of corresponding colors and sounds which was based upon the cycle of fifths and the light spectrum. (1908-1910)

monsieurcroche:

Famous chord near the end of Scriabin’s Sonata No. 7 (1911), spanning 5 octaves.

monsieurcroche:

Famous chord near the end of Scriabin’s Sonata No. 7 (1911), spanning 5 octaves.

classicalconditioningblog:

Happy birthday to Russian pianist, composer, and Movember participant Alexander Scriabin!

Born on January 6, 1872, Scriabin pioneered a distinctly Russian, post-tonal style that transitioned Western music from the late Romantic era into the 20th century.  Listen to his Piano Sonata No. 5 here.

(Photo sources: last.fm; Carnegie Hall; DoveSong.com)

Vladimir Horowitz - Alexander Scriabin - 12 Etudes for piano, Op.8 - No. 12 in D sharp minor
1,031 plays

whiteparkbay:

(1986) Vladimir Horowitz - Alexander Scriabin - 12 Etudes for piano, Op.8 - No. 12 in D sharp minor [Horowitz In Moscow]

901 plays

mrutssamoht:

Definitely one of the most intense interpretations of the G-sharp minor Piano Etude from Scriabin’s op. 8 collection. My personal favorite performance from Piers Lane’s Etude collection.

Glenn Gould - Scriabin: Piano Sonata No.3 in F-Sharp Minor, Op.23: 1. Dramatico
649 plays

heartinwinter:

Scriabin: Piano Sonata No.3 in F-Sharp Minor, Op.23 - 1. Dramatico

Glenn Gould

119 plays

unmusical:

 


Audio: Part I “Universe” of Mysterium; Berlin Symphony Orchestra conducted by Vladimir Ashkenazy
Picture: Alexander Nemtin (left), Alexander Scriabin (right)

Alexander Scriabin - Mysterium (Realized by Alexander Nemtin)

In 1903, Russian composer Alexander Scriabin began work on Mysterium, a mammoth piece scored for an orchestra, a large mixed choir, an instrument with visual effects, dancers, a procession, incense, and rhythmic textural articulation. Scriabin planned for this work to be synesthetic, incorporating the senses of smell and touch as well as hearing. The composer wrote that:

“There will not be a single spectator. All will be participants. The work requires special people, special artists and a completely new culture.”

The premiere of Mysterium was to be given in a temple in the foothills of the Himalayas, and the piece itself would last for a full 7 days and nights. According to Scriabin, the end of the performance would bring about a glorious apocalypse, in which the universe would enter a state of ecstasy and humans would be replaced by “nobler beings”.

Unfortunately, Scriabin passed away in 1915 from septicemia before his masterpiece even had a chance to be finished. At the time of his death, Scriabin left 72 pages of sketches for the Prefatory Action, which was only a prelude to Mysterium. Composer Alexander Nemtin then took on the task of assembling together these sketches into a three-hour performable version, a feat that took him 28 years.

karismaputri:

themagiclantern:

bearlegs:kindofbleu:wexwex

Synaesthesia:
A survey of 8 key signatures, and the colours the two composers associated each key signature with.

karismaputri:

themagiclantern:

bearlegs:kindofbleu:wexwex

Synaesthesia:

A survey of 8 key signatures, and the colours the two composers associated each key signature with.


Keys arranged in a circle of fifths in order to show the spectral relationship


Scriabin’s synesthesia and key-color associations make much more sense in this chart compared to this one:

Keys arranged in a circle of fifths in order to show the spectral relationship

Scriabin’s synesthesia and key-color associations make much more sense in this chart compared to this one:


160 playsDownload

leadingtone:

Scriabin - Poème in F-sharp major, Op. 32, No. 1
Vladimir Horowitz, piano (1963)