aurelie-dupont:

American Ballet Theatre corps Kaho Ogawa 10 pirouettes

aurelie-dupont:

American Ballet Theatre corps Kaho Ogawa 10 pirouettes

archaicwonder:

Phrygian-Chalcidian bronze winged helmet, 4th century BCE

archaicwonder:

Phrygian-Chalcidian bronze winged helmet, 4th century BCE

ratak-monodosico:

Klaus Leidorf - Chapel and Ground Station Near Raisting (2006)

ratak-monodosico:

Klaus Leidorf - Chapel and Ground Station Near Raisting (2006)

artemisdreaming:

Arturo Toscanini playing piano in his home. In the library case on a side are the death masks of Beethoven, Wagner and Verdi. Milan, Italy, 1954
Alfred Eisenstaedt  (via: fansinflashbulb.wordpress) 

artemisdreaming:

Arturo Toscanini playing piano in his home. In the library case on a side are the death masks of Beethoven, Wagner and Verdi. Milan, Italy, 1954

Alfred Eisenstaedt  (via: fansinflashbulb.wordpress) 

npylog:

Telefunken transistor radio, 1963. Sweet Mid-Century audio design.

npylog:

Telefunken transistor radio, 1963. Sweet Mid-Century audio design.

Werner Thomas - Les Larmes Du Jacqueline - Jacques Offenbach
121 plays

kinoaida:

Jaques Offenbach - Les Larmes Du Jacqueline

Werner Thomas - cello

Hans Stadlmair - conduct

Münchener Kammerorchester

Harmonies du soir : Virtuose Celloromantik

Orfeo / 1995

ancientart:

Kitchen Tender being Rowed. Egyptian, ca. 1981–1975 B.C., from the Tomb of Meketre.

Many outings of Egyptian nobles culminated in a picnic. On the menu for Meketre’s boat trip were roasted fowl, dried beef, bread, beer, and some kind of soup. Meat and bread were carried on another model of a tender, now in Cairo. Here, the beer is prepared and the soup cooked. A blackened trough may have contained burning coal for roasting the fowl. A man tends a stove on which soup simmers. On either side, a woman grinds grain. Brewers inside the cabin are shaping bread loaves, then working them through sieves into large vats. One brewer stands in another vat, where he tramples the dates that provide the sugar for the fermentation of the beer. The oars of this boat are fixed to the sides; to avoid damaging the oars while the boats were transported and deposited in the model chamber, all oars of Meketre’s boats were secured in this manner. (met)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections20.3.3.

history-of-fashion:

1531 Lucas Cranach the Elder - Judith Dining with Holofernes

history-of-fashion:

1531 Lucas Cranach the Elder - Judith Dining with Holofernes

ancient-serpent:

L’Opéra Royal in the Chateau de Versailles (by Andre Costantini)
ratak-monodosico:

Emperor Charles V by Jakob Seisenegger, 1532

ratak-monodosico:

Emperor Charles V by Jakob Seisenegger, 1532

homilius:

visualizingmath:

Harmonices Mundi (Harmony of the World) by Johannes Kepler, 1619
In Harmonices Mundi (1619) Kepler attempted to explain the harmony of the world and contained what is known today as his third law. The work was founded on geometry, from which Kepler derived first a theory of musical harmony and then a cosmology of the heavens and the earth. Kepler attempted to find common rules between music and movement in the solar system. His music of the spheres is based on the relative maximum and minimum angular velocities of the planet measured from the sun. Using his theories, Kepler allotted to the planets musical intervals and musical motion.
“The Earth sings Mi, Fa, Mi: you may infer even from the syllables that in this our home misery and famine hold sway" -Kepler.
Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) was a German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer. A key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution, he is best known for his laws of planetary motion based on his works Astronomia nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. These works also provided one of the foundations for Isaac Newton’s theory of universal gravitation.
Prints of Harmonices Mundi are available here. Does anyone know what “Hiclocum haber eriam” means?

Answer to the question: It’s hic locum habet etiam (This [celestial body] always holds this place). It’s the moon.

homilius:

visualizingmath:

Harmonices Mundi (Harmony of the World) by Johannes Kepler, 1619

In Harmonices Mundi (1619) Kepler attempted to explain the harmony of the world and contained what is known today as his third law. The work was founded on geometry, from which Kepler derived first a theory of musical harmony and then a cosmology of the heavens and the earth. Kepler attempted to find common rules between music and movement in the solar system. His music of the spheres is based on the relative maximum and minimum angular velocities of the planet measured from the sun. Using his theories, Kepler allotted to the planets musical intervals and musical motion.

The Earth sings Mi, Fa, Mi: you may infer even from the syllables that in this our home misery and famine hold sway" -Kepler.

Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) was a German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer. A key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution, he is best known for his laws of planetary motion based on his works Astronomia nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. These works also provided one of the foundations for Isaac Newton’s theory of universal gravitation.

Prints of Harmonices Mundi are available here. Does anyone know what “Hiclocum haber eriam” means?

Answer to the question: It’s hic locum habet etiam (This [celestial body] always holds this place). It’s the moon.


George Field, Field’s Harmony of Colour, 1817. Chromatics. Essay on the analogy and harmony of colours. London. Via Linda Hall Library

George Field, Field’s Harmony of Colour, 1817. Chromatics. Essay on the analogy and harmony of colours. London. Via Linda Hall Library

Concerto Kolin - Concerto a quattro da chiesa Op.2 No.1 in D minor/ I. Largo
148 plays

aclergymansdaughter:

Evaristo Felice dall’Abaco (1675-1742).

An Italian composer and cellist, Dall’Abaco was born in Verona, the son of renowned guitarist Damiano dall’Abaco. His father, after seeing his son’s musical talent in school, let him take on violin and cello lessons. He is thought to be Torelli's pupil from whom he would have learned violin and cello.

He launched his musical career as a violinist with Tommaso Antonio Vitali in Modena, and in 1704 he joined the court of Maximilian II Emanuel, elector of Bavaria as Kammermusiker. Dall’Abaco was only a few months in Munich, when he was forced to flee with the court to Brussels, following Maximilian’s defeat at the Battle of Blenheim. On Maximilian’s restoration and return to Munich, in 1715, dall’Abaco was appointed Concert-meister. He continued to compose chamber music at the French and Dutch courts until 1740 when he retired.

questionableadvice:

~ Etiquette; Or, A Guide To The Usages of Society, by Count Alfred D’Orsay, 1843

questionableadvice:

~ Etiquette; Or, A Guide To The Usages of Society, by Count Alfred D’Orsay, 1843

64 plays

oranc:

Mahler: Symphony No. 1 in D major “Titan” - IV. Stuermisch bewegt-Energisch