ancientart:

Ancient post-it notes!

romkids:

How often do you reach for a Post-It note? Maybe you’re making that to do list, or figuring out your groceries. But you know, what if you lived BEFORE Post-It notes or scrap paper? What would you use then?

In Thebes, where these examples are from, and across the Roman Empire, scraps of used and broken pottery would be used to scribble quick notes. These examples are called ostraka. Most of the ostraka that our conservators and curators are studying right now contain notes on taxes and granary receipts from the second century AD.

The notes are written in Greek script. Kay Sunahara, ROM archaeologist studying these pieces, described the Greek langage at the time as, “the lingua franca of the Mediterranean”. Greek was the most frequently used written language, used to help bridge the gap between speakers of different languages, much like English today.

The majority of these pieces we’re found and acquired in the early 1900’s by none other than ROM founder Charles T. Currelly.

So how are these scrap pieces of pottery useful to archaeology today? Are grocery lists really that vaulabe? For archaeologists, ostraka provide them with a great deal of information about the people who left these notes in the first place. Information such as what people were eating, trading for, in trouble for, and the prices of things, give us a unique look into those who lived far before us, in this case well over a thousand years ago.

Interestingly enough, it also shows us just how similar we are to those who lived long before. Everyone needs groceries, and a reminder letter, maybe from their mom, or from their husband, of what to get from the store.

National Archaeology Day takes place on October 20th at the ROM and many other museums around the world!

composersdoingnormalshit:

Camille Saint-Saëns rocking some jammies.

composersdoingnormalshit:

Camille Saint-Saëns rocking some jammies.

Sexteto Mayor - Inspiración
48 plays

chansondeladieu:

Luis Rubistein - Inspiración

I seem to be having this tremendous difficulty with my lifestyle. As soon as I reach some kind of definite policy about what is my kind of music and my kind of restaurant, and my kind of overdraft, people start blowing up my kind of planet and throwing me out of their kind of spaceships. It’s so hard to build up anything coherent…
Arthur Dent, from The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide Radio Series (via hitchhikersguidetothegalaxy)
I have perfected the selfie

I have perfected the selfie

losingmyself-gainingmyself:

Pardon?
history-of-fashion:

1775 Johann Ernst Heinsius - Portrait of Mathematician Pierre-Simon de Laplace

history-of-fashion:

1775 Johann Ernst Heinsius - Portrait of Mathematician Pierre-Simon de Laplace

Vienna Hofburgkapelle Choir - Gregorian Chant: Introit For Easter Sunday
172 plays

emmadelosnardos:

Anonymous (Gregorian Chant)
Vienna Hofburgkapelle Choir
Introit For Easter Sunday
x

mediumaevum:

Usually associated with Christmas, mincemeat can be a great addition to your Easter feast. Read this great text about it, and it’s medieval roots, and get down to business.

Ingredients:

  • 1 quantity of  homemade mincemeat 
  • 4 large quince (or good baking apples)
  • 2oz melted unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons coarse brown sugar (optional)
  • powdered sugar for dusting

Recipe:

  1. Prepare mincemeat according to directions and store in a cool, dark place. Bring to room temperature.
  2. Pre-heat oven to 350F/175C
  3. Cut quince or apple in two pieces. The bottom should be about two-thirds of the fruit, with the top being the other third, where the stork is.
  4. With a paring knife core and empty most of quince or apple flesh, leaving half an inch (1cm) wall around the outside on both top and bottom pieces. Leave skin on.
  5. Fill cavity in bottom with mincemeat and pile high.
  6. Top with lid and brush fruit lightly all over with melted butter, and sprinkle with brown sugar (latter is optional).
  7. Place in oven and bake for 40-50 minutes until quince/apple is nicely browned and wilting but not collapsed.
  8. Allow to cool for 5 or 10 minutes before serving dusted with powdered sugar, and with your choice of seasonal sauce/whipped cream/ice cream.
mediumaevum:

Happy Easter everyone! I hope you have a nice day with your friends and families. 
Hex

mediumaevum:

Happy Easter everyone! I hope you have a nice day with your friends and families. 

Hex

tierradentro:

“Christ Risen From the Tomb”, c.1490, Lombard Bergognone.

Happy Easter!

tierradentro:

Christ Risen From the Tomb”, c.1490, Lombard Bergognone.

Happy Easter!

18thcenturyladies:

Frédérique Louise Wilhelmine, Princesse d’Orange-Nassau, by Johann Friedrich August Tischbein.
 1788

18thcenturyladies:

Frédérique Louise Wilhelmine, Princesse d’Orange-Nassau, by Johann Friedrich August Tischbein.

 1788

Wynton Marsalis - Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra in D major, I. Adagio
2,261 plays

normaltd:

Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra in D major, I. Adagio - Michael Haydn

Neeme Jarvi, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra - Rimsky-Korsakov: Russian Easter Festival Overture
53 playsDownload

idroolinmysleep:

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, Russian Easter Festival Overture, op. 36, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järvi, cond.