Vitamin String Quartet - This is Halloween
30,529 playsDownload

"This is Halloween" performed by the Vitamin String Quartet

You can thank me later.

The Doors - Alabama Song (Whiskey Bar)
10,915 plays

kshhh:

The Doors - Alabama Song

2,403 plays

Dem Bones performed by Fats Waller.

sonateharder:

Erard, Paris, 1840. Six and two thirds octaves, CC-a4 (originally to g). Inventor of the double-escapement repetition action, Erard was the direct competitor of Pleyel. Liszt’s preference was for Erard’s more dramatic range of tone colors, while Chopin played both makes, preferring the more intimate sound of the Pleyel except when he was feeling ill and wanted a piano that would produce more effects with less effort. This piano works well for both composers’ music. (via The Historic Piano Collection)

sonateharder:

Erard, Paris, 1840. Six and two thirds octaves, CC-a4 (originally to g). Inventor of the double-escapement repetition action, Erard was the direct competitor of Pleyel. Liszt’s preference was for Erard’s more dramatic range of tone colors, while Chopin played both makes, preferring the more intimate sound of the Pleyel except when he was feeling ill and wanted a piano that would produce more effects with less effort. This piano works well for both composers’ music. (via The Historic Piano Collection)

Antonio Vivaldi - Cello Concerto In G Minor, RV 416 - 1. Allegro
8,503 plays

grindabod:

Antonio Vivaldi - Cello Concerto in G minor, RV 416: 1. Allegro

The Academy of Ancient Music, Christopher Hogwood; Christophe Coin (cello)

Vivaldi wrote more than 500 concertos. About 350 of these are for solo instrument and strings, of which 230 are for violin, the others being for bassoon, cello, oboe, flute, viola d’amore, recorder, lute, or mandolin.
Vivaldi’s music was innovative. He brightened the formal and rhythmic structure of the concerto, in which he looked for harmonic contrasts and innovative melodies and themes; many of his compositions are flamboyantly, almost playfully, exuberant.

(linkiTunes - Spotify)

sakrogoat:

Georges Antoine Rochegrosse - The Death of Messalina

sakrogoat:

Georges Antoine Rochegrosse - The Death of Messalina

intimesgonebyblog:

Ballet Le Poisson doré. Circa 1905.

intimesgonebyblog:

Ballet Le Poisson doré. Circa 1905.

mini-girlz:

The Singer exhibited 1889
Bronze, coloured resin paste and semi-precious stones
902 x 216 x 432 mm
Tate

via > tate.org.uk

mini-girlz:

The Singer exhibited 1889
Bronze, coloured resin paste and semi-precious stones
902 x 216 x 432 mm
Tate
Christopher Hogwood (10 September 1941 – 24 September 2014) 
We’ve lost a lot of monumental figures this past year but Christopher Hogwood was possibly the greatest game-changer for classical music performances. 

Christopher Hogwood (10 September 1941 – 24 September 2014) 

We’ve lost a lot of monumental figures this past year but Christopher Hogwood was possibly the greatest game-changer for classical music performances. 

thursdayfilebuzz:

Christopher Hogwood  (Christopher Jarvis Haley Hogwood CBE, MA (Cantab), HonMusD (Cantab))
Born: September 10 1941, Nottingham, England
Died: September 24 2014 (aged 73), Cambridge, England
He was an English conductor, harpsichordist, writer, musicologist and founder of the Academy of Ancient Music.
The conductor and harpsichordist Christopher Hogwood has died
September 24 2014 — Gramophone
Hogwood has died at the age of 73 following an illness lasting several months
It has been announced that the conductor Christopher Hogwood has died at the age of 73. The official announcement on Hogwood’s website reads,’Following an illness lasting several months, Christopher died peacefully on Wednesday 24 September, a fortnight after his 73rd birthday. He was at home in Cambridge, with family present. The funeral will be private, with a memorial service to be held at a later date.’
Hogwood’s Mozart symphony-cycle  with the Academy of Ancient Music, which began in the late 1970s, won a Gramophone Award and changed the perception of period-instrument performance. Hogwood founded the Early Music Consort in 1967 with David Munrow, and the Academy of Ancient Music in 1973. He was awarded a CBE in 1989.
When Hogwood was interviewed by Gramophone in 2002 he looked back to the roots of Historically Informed Performance: ‘I’m a Handel and Haydn man. But that’s not where it all began. I’d come from playing medieval music with David Munrow. It was completely speculative, a sort of inspired circus, putting on a host of colourful works to entertain, very well run on the concert platform. But there were a number of worrying things about it; one was the impression it gave the world that most medieval music consisted of instrumental, secular music when 98 per cent was religious, sacred vocal music. And the other one was that there is so little surviving evidence of what really went on, what it actually sounded like.’ So began an unforgettable musical journey.

Notes: Hogwood’s discography, which includes the complete Mozart and Beethoven symphonies, boasts over 200 recordings with the Academy of Ancient Music on Decca, many of which have attracted some of the world’s most prestigious awards.
Links: http://www.hogwood.org/
http://www.allmusic.com/artist/christopher-hogwood-mn0000092572/discography

www.thursdayfile.com

Händel, Georg Friederich - Combatti da forte Aria: Almirena
107 plays

gatogus:

Cecilia Bartoli “Combatti da forte” dall’Ópera “Rinaldo” di G.F.Händel.

"Cobatti da forte" Aria di Almirena dall’Ópera "Rinaldo di Georg Friedrich Händel.

David Daniels Contratenor (Rinaldo)

Cecilia Bartoli Mezzosoprano (Almirena)

Luba Orgonasova Soprano (Armida)

Bernarda Fink Mezzosoprano (Goffredo)

Daniel Taylor Contratenor (Eustazio)

Gerald Finley Basso (Argante)

Bejun Mehta Contratenor (Mago Cristiano)

Mark Padmore Tenor (Araldo)

The Academy of ancient music

Christopher Hogwood Director

Handel: Rinaldo - Complete Opera (Original 1711 Version) HWV7a - Academy of Ancient Music, Cecilia Bartoli, Christopher Hogwood & David Daniels

Christopher Hogwood, The Academy of Ancient Music - Symphony No. 74 in E-flat major: 1. Vivace assai
387 plays

homilius:

Haydn, Symphony No. 74 in E-flat major (1781): 1. Vivace assai

The Academy of Ancient Music • Christopher Hogwood (1995)

Self-portrait in the Studio, Joseph Abel

On that shortlist of “symphonies you wish just went on forever,” this one’s somewhere near the very top. 

Christopher Hogwood - Fantasy in C major, Wq. 59 No. 6, H. 284
287 plays

homilius:

C.P.E. Bach, Fantasy in C major, Wq. 59 No. 6 (1784)

Christopher Hogwood, fortepiano (1976)

When playing this Fantasy (one of my favorites), with its jolting back-and-forth shifts of tempo and rhythm, I remember a passage from Tristram Shandy, Vol. 7 (‘Now this is the most puzzled skein of all…’), where Tristram, mid-journey between Auxerre and Lyons, talks about how he’s been multiplied in memory, because while writing that travelogue he’s reminded of another one of his selves who in another time is also traveling from Auxerre to Lyons — with his father and Uncle Toby. And so, as he says, he’s this moment in a post-chaise shattered into a thousand pieces, and also this moment sitting on the banks of the Garonne in a ‘handsome pavilion…rhapsodising all these affairs.’ Those alsos of memory, jarring and endlessly discursive, toss the narrator from story to story and time to time (there’s a pun I see now in La Jetée, the Marker film, whose central idea is just this: temporal displacement or time travel through memory).

What one loses in creating a musical piece according to this idea of rhapsodizing on feelings felt in places past, is the unified progression of a single feeling over the course of a piece: the Einheit der musikalischen Empfindung. And Emanuel Bach, especially in his later years, actively avoided this. Almost always he shoots clear of the Sestos extreme of sentimentality, but the other way is the Abydos of sensationalism. But at his best — as he is here — he’s capable of bringing something to music that I’d only seen in literature: selfhood’s multiplicity, its endlessly strange recurrences, as seen through memory’s eye.

For all we know he could have read Sterne — he was immensely popular in Germany in the 1770s, in the Bode translation, and Bach was a good friend of Lessing and Moses Mendelssohn, and active in literary circles. But if he didn’t, there are some experimental aspects of his style that remind me of Tristram Shandy. (Think also of the many little mid-story interruptions, from Uncle Toby, Trim, Susannah, Dr. Slop, and the narrator himself.)